Fighting alopecia

Alopecia is a very common disorder that results in unpredictable hair loss. It affects many people of all ages, but usually around the age of 30.
Alopecia means the absence or insufficient density of hair in areas where normally it would be present in a regular volume.

Types of alopecia

Alopecia can be a congenital or an acquired condition. The congenial alopecia is a rare form, characterized by a complete or partial absence of hair follicles due to genetic causes. In most cases, this form cannot be treated effectively and active symptomatic treatment can only slow down the progress of hair loss.

Alopecia

Male (genetic)

The most common type of acquired alopecia is androgenetic alopecia, in 95% of male cases. It is is genetically determined and characterised by hair loss mainly in the frontal, occipital or parietal areas of the scalp (see Norwood scale). The condition is based on the activity of the male sex hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which affects the hair follicles.

Female

Despite androgenetic type of alopecia being caused by the male sex hormones, the problem appears in women, in the rate of 20-90%, but the symptoms in women are not striking. At the same time, hormonal imbalances can occur both due to age-related processes or as a result of medication or after surgery. Women’s androgenetic alopecia affects the parietal, frontal, occipital areas (see Ludwig scale).

Diffuse alopecia or telogen effluvium alopecia is a process of proportional hair loss in all anatomical areas of the scalp. This form of alopecia is associated with a violation of the general metabolism, which leads to a failure of the hair growth cycle. By prevalence, this type of alopecia takes the second place and is more common in women. There are telogen and anagen forms of diffuse alopecia. As the name suggests, in the telogen form, most of the hair follicles go into the sleeping phase (telogen), ceasing to form the hair, but not dying. The causes of this type of baldness may be stress, hormonal.

Alopecia

Male (genetic)

The most common type of acquired alopecia is androgenetic alopecia, in 95% of male cases. It is is genetically determined and characterised by hair loss mainly in the frontal, occipital or parietal areas of the scalp (see Norwood scale). The condition is based on the activity of the male sex hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which affects the hair follicles.

Female

Despite androgenetic type of alopecia being caused by the male sex hormones, the problem appears in women, in the rate of 20-90%, but the symptoms in women are not striking. At the same time, hormonal imbalances can occur both due to age-related processes or as a result of medication or after surgery. Women’s androgenetic alopecia affects the parietal, frontal, occipital areas (see Ludwig scale).

Diffuse alopecia or telogen effluvium alopecia is a process of proportional hair loss in all anatomical areas of the scalp. This form of alopecia is associated with a violation of the general metabolism, which leads to a failure of the hair growth cycle. By prevalence, this type of alopecia takes the second place and is more common in women. There are telogen and anagen forms of diffuse alopecia. As the name suggests, in the telogen form, most of the hair follicles go into the sleeping phase (telogen), ceasing to form the hair, but not dying. The causes of this type of baldness may be stress, hormonal.

Symptoms

The main symptom of alopecia is patchy hair loss. Hair falls out in patches, mainly from the scalp, but other sites too. Hair can re-grow from the follicles when the inflammation subsides. The falling out can happen in a matter of few days, or in longer episodes.

Diagnostics

Doctors can usually diagnose alopecia easily and quickly, by noticing the symptoms, examinaing the hair under the microscope or a blood test.

Symptoms

The main symptom of alopecia is patchy hair loss. Hair falls out in patches, mainly from the scalp, but other sites too. Hair can re-grow from the follicles when the inflammation subsides. The falling out can happen in a matter of few days, or in longer episodes.

Diagnostics

Doctors can usually diagnose alopecia easily and quickly, by noticing the symptoms, examinaing the hair under the microscope or a blood test.

Less invasive treatments

PRP 

is a short term for platelet-rich plasma. Plasma is a component of the blood which contains special proteins that help the blood to clot. Platelet is a disk-shaped cell that circulates through bloodstream along with white and red blood cells. It contains the natural growth factor, which stimulates hair follicles and soft tissues and skin of the scalp in case they are damaged. Beside the growth factor, they contain proteins and cytokines that support cell recovery.

Stem Cells intradermal injection

Decreased blood supply to the hair follicles – medically called “ischemia” is the first factor in hair loss. It can result from genetics, ageing, or even certain autoimmune diseases which can develop during the years. Inflammation is the second factor involved in hair loss. Inflammation alters the normal growth processes of the follicles, also causing hair growth to slow down or even stop. Stem cells, however, can grow several types of cells in the body. Additionally, Stem cells have a very strong anti-inflammatory effect. And adipose fat tissue is a rich source of these stem cells.

Less invasive treatments

PRP 

is a short term for platelet-rich plasma. Plasma is a component of the blood which contains special proteins that help the blood to clot. Platelet is a disk-shaped cell that circulates through bloodstream along with white and red blood cells. It contains the natural growth factor, which stimulates hair follicles and soft tissues and skin of the scalp in case they are damaged. Beside the growth factor, they contain proteins and cytokines that support cell recovery.

Stem Cells intradermal injection

Decreased blood supply to the hair follicles – medically called “ischemia” is the first factor in hair loss. It can result from genetics, ageing, or even certain autoimmune diseases which can develop during the years. Inflammation is the second factor involved in hair loss. Inflammation alters the normal growth processes of the follicles, also causing hair growth to slow down or even stop. Stem cells, however, can grow several types of cells in the body. Additionally, Stem cells have a very strong anti-inflammatory effect. And adipose fat tissue is a rich source of these stem cells.

More invasive treatments

Fat injections

How is fat injection rendered?

We do fat injection under the skin to restore the plain of fatty tissue. This is important because hair follicles have to be in contact with adipose tissue to function well.

How do we extract fat?

The fat extraction is accomplished through a liposuction procedure. The amount that we extract is divided into two parts – one goes under the scalp, and the other one is used for stem cell isolation. In order to achieve the best possible results, we wait about 3 months after the procedure to evaluate hair density for the improvement. Our main goal here is hair growth stimulation. However, if that doesn’t happen, we do a follicular unit extraction (FUE).

Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE)

This procedure focuses on harvesting hair through small circular incisions over a considerably larger area of the donor zone which, as a result, leaves tiny, round and white scars.

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More invasive treatments

Fat injections

How is fat injection rendered?

We do fat injection under the skin to restore the plain of fatty tissue. This is important because hair follicles have to be in contact with adipose tissue to function well.

How do we extract fat?

The fat extraction is accomplished through a liposuction procedure. The amount that we extract is divided into two parts – one goes under the scalp, and the other one is used for stem cell isolation. In order to achieve the best possible results, we wait about 3 months after the procedure to evaluate hair density for the improvement. Our main goal here is hair growth stimulation. However, if that doesn’t happen, we do a follicular unit extraction (FUE).

Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE)

This procedure focuses on harvesting hair through small circular incisions over a considerably larger area of the donor zone which, as a result, leaves tiny, round and white scars.

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